NOTICIAS RECIENTES SOBRE CALIDAD DEL AIRE

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study

Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself.

10.Ago.2020


Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur in the environment

New research identifies fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands as the largest source of sulfur in the environment -- up to 10 times higher than the peak sulfur load seen in the second half of the 20th century, during the days of acid rain.

10.Ago.2020


An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica

A professor presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae.

10.Ago.2020


Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years

The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees.

10.Ago.2020


Predicting drought in the American West just got more difficult

A new study of more than 1,000 years of North American droughts and global conditions found that forecasting a lack of precipitation is rarely straightforward.

08.Ago.2020


COVID recovery choices shape future climate

A new study warns that even with some lockdown measures staying in place to the end of 2021, without more structural interventions global temperatures will only be roughly 0.01°C lower than expected by 2030. However, the study estimates that including climate policy measures as part of an economic recovery plan with strong green stimulus could prevent more than half of additional warming expected by 2050 under current policies.

07.Ago.2020


New science behind algae-based flip-flops

Sustainable flip-flops: A team of researchers has formulated polyurethane foams made from algae oil to meet commercial specifications for midsole shoes and the foot-bed of flip-flops.

06.Ago.2020


'Roaming reactions' study to shed new light on atmospheric molecules

For the first time, a team of chemists has lifted the hood on the mechanics involved in the mysterious interplay between sunlight and molecules in the atmosphere known as 'roaming reactions', which could make atmospheric modelling more accurate.

06.Ago.2020


Analysis of renewable energy points toward more affordable carbon-free electricity

A study identifies long-term storage technologies that would enhance the affordability and reliability of renewable electricity.

06.Ago.2020


Scientists identify missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

Researchers report that anthropogenic sources of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), not just oceanic sources, account for much of the missing source of OCS in the atmosphere. Their findings provide better context for estimates of global photosynthesis (taking up CO2) using OCS dynamics.

06.Ago.2020


New acid mine drainage treatment turns waste into valuable critical minerals

A new way to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) could help transform the environmental pollution problem into an important domestic source of the critical rare earth elements needed to produce technology ranging from smart phones to fighter jets, according to scientists.

05.Ago.2020


Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean

New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. A new paper reports that the eggs compete with the algae to assimilate carbon from their surroundings - a finding that could inform similar processes in the dark ocean.

05.Ago.2020


Drivers who keep their windows down are exposed to 80 percent more air pollution

Car users from the world's least affluent cities are exposed to a disproportionate amount of in-car air pollution because they rely heavily on opening their windows for ventilation, a new study finds.

05.Ago.2020


Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns

Marketers can lead how their companies can use the cost and demand effects of reducing the carbon footprint of their products to determine the profit-maximizing design.

05.Ago.2020


Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space

As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers have used airplanes and a satellite to uncover disparities in nitrogen dioxide amounts in the atmosphere above Houston.

05.Ago.2020


In a warming world, New England's trees are storing more carbon

The study reveals that the rate at which carbon is captured from the atmosphere at Harvard Forest nearly doubled between 1992 and 2015.

04.Ago.2020


Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem

Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won't solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows.

04.Ago.2020


Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?

The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders.

30.Jul.2020


Coastal cities leave up to 75% of seafloor exposed to harmful light pollution

New research is the first in the world to quantify the extent to which biologically important artificial light is prevalent on the seafloor and could, in turn, be having a detrimental effect on marine species.

30.Jul.2020


Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture

A new report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country.

29.Jul.2020


New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C

Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Now, researchers have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels water.

29.Jul.2020


Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms

Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms. These storms are believed to be caused by the release of enormous amounts of stored magnetic energy due to changes in the magnetic field of the sun's outer atmosphere - something that until now has eluded scientists' direct measurement. Researchers believe this recent discovery could lead to better 'space weather' forecasts in the future.

29.Jul.2020


U.S. should consider 'stay-at-home' cooling options during pandemic

A new study from Australian scientists at the forefront of climate and health modelling suggests electric fans and water dousing could be a viable stay-at-home cooling strategy as the United States anticipates extreme heat.

29.Jul.2020


Melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018

A study details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer. Its findings give an overview of how sea ice has receded over the 40 years of the satellite era and show how the summer's extensive decline is linked to global atmospheric processes as far south as the tropics.

29.Jul.2020


COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems

Researchers hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environment.

29.Jul.2020


Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau

Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research. The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth.

29.Jul.2020


How Salt Lake's buildings affect its climate future

With climate change, we'll need less natural gas for heat and more electricity for cooling -- but what's the balance? Researchers used hyper-localized climate models and building projections to find out. The answer is that buildings' energy use in the future varies wildly, depending on the climate scenario, and that local building policy now could have a big impact on energy use in the future.

28.Jul.2020


New soil models may ease atmospheric CO2, climate change

To remove carbon dioxide from the Earth's atmosphere in an effort to slow climate change, scientists must get their hands dirty and peek underground.

28.Jul.2020


Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants

Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. The team developed two approaches to control the functions of plant proteins related to the transport of hydrophobic pollutants. These findings will lead to these new functions of pesticides being utilized in agriculture, enabling safer crops to be produced.

28.Jul.2020


Lockdown saw modest drop in China air pollution, study finds

Large improvements of air quality in China during the COVID-19 lockdown have been widely reported, but new research reveals that the two pollutants most harmful to human health, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, were only slightly reduced.

27.Jul.2020


Scientists record rapid carbon loss from warming peatlands

Scientists have demonstrated a direct relationship between climate warming and carbon loss in a peatland ecosystem. Their study provides a glimpse of potential futures where significant stores of carbon in peat bogs could be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases.

27.Jul.2020


Seismic waves help scientists 'see' chemical changes beneath a watershed

Chemical reactions deep below ground affect water quality, but methods for 'seeing' them are time-consuming, expensive and limited in scope. A research team found that seismic waves can help to identify these reactions under an entire watershed and protect groundwater resources.

27.Jul.2020


Make your own greenhouse gas logger

Researchers have developed a simple logger for greenhouse gas flows. It is built using inexpensive and easily available parts, and provides data on levels of methane, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity.

27.Jul.2020


Plastic flow into ocean expected to triple by 2040, action could stem tide more than 80%

A new analysis finds that without immediate and sustained action, the annual flow of plastic into the ocean could nearly triple by 2040. The study also identifies solutions that could cut this volume by more than 80% using technologies available today, if key decision-makers make system-wide changes.

23.Jul.2020


New technique to capture carbon dioxide could greatly reduce power plant greenhouse gases

Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is ever more urgent to limit the damage from climate change. Chemists have come up with an efficient and less expensive technique for removing CO2 from natural gas plant emissions. The technique could be tweaked for more polluting plants that use coal. The chemists took a magnesium-based metal-organic framework and added a tetraamine that catalyzes a CO2 polymer easily removed by low-temperature steam.

23.Jul.2020


COVID-19 lockdown caused 50 percent global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations

The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50 percent between March and May 2020.

23.Jul.2020


Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators

Scientists say the noise from boats and ships slows down the activity of baby fish on coral reefs, which leaves them more vulnerable to their predators.

23.Jul.2020


Mercury remains a persistent poison in Connecticut's Still River

Researchers are beginning to unravel how century-old mercury pollution impacts local food web.

23.Jul.2020


Lightning strikes more than 100 million times per year in the tropics

Tropical storms often begin with an impressive display of pyrotechnics, but researchers have largely overlooked the role of lightning strikes in tropical ecosystems.

23.Jul.2020


Narrow wavebands of UV light kill germs

Scientists report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

22.Jul.2020


Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior

Researchers are the first to characterize the ecology and fine-scale habitat use of 'near threatened' whitespotted eagle rays in Florida while also identifying areas of potential interactions between this species and multiple environmental threats. Biotelemetry provided unique insights into this species' occupancy, which is not apparent at the landscape-scale. Prolonged observations showed affinities for habitats of considerable recreational and commercial importance, like inlets, channels, and clam aquaculture lease sites close to shore.

22.Jul.2020


Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe

Studying historical documents from 5 centuries, scientists were able to compare flood events from the past with recent flood events in Europe. This combination of historical and hydrological research provides evidence for the strong influence of climate change on rivers and floodings. Floods tend to be larger, the timing has shifted and the relationship between flood occurrence and air temperatures has reversed.

22.Jul.2020


COVID-19 shutdown led to increased solar power output

As the air cleared after lockdowns, solar installations in Delhi produced 8 percent more power, a new study shows.

22.Jul.2020


Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks

Research confirms dragonfly larvae as ''biosentinels'' to indicate mercury pollution and presents the first-ever survey of mercury pollution in the U.S. National Park System.

22.Jul.2020


Plant roots increase carbon emission from permafrost soils

A key uncertainty in climate projections is the amount of carbon emitted by thawing permafrost in the Arctic. Plant roots in soil stimulate microbial decomposition, a mechanism called the priming effect. An international research team shows that the priming effect alone can cause emission of 40 billion tonnes carbon from permafrost by 2100.

20.Jul.2020


What silicone wristbands say about chemical exposure in Uruguayan children

Researchers used silicone wristbands to examine the extent of chemical exposure among a small group of children in Montevideo, Uruguay. The 6- to 8-year-olds wore the bands for seven days. After analyzing the wristbands, researchers found an average of 13 pollutants in each one collected. Some of the wristbands showed exposure to DDT, a harmful pesticide that has been banned for use in many countries, including the U.S., since the 1970s.

20.Jul.2020


Regular exercise helps prevent high blood pressure, even in areas of high air pollution

Regular physical activity is a healthy way to prevent and reduce high blood pressure, even in places where pollution levels are relatively high. Air pollution increases high blood pressure risk, yet it does not outweigh the benefits of physical activity on high blood pressure prevention. Addressing air pollution remains important for high blood pressure prevention.

20.Jul.2020


Geoengineering is just a partial solution to fight climate change

Could we create massive sulfuric acid clouds that limit global warming and help meet the 2015 Paris international climate goals, while reducing unintended impacts? Yes, in theory, according to a new study. Spraying sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere at different locations, to form sulfuric acid clouds that block some solar radiation, could be adjusted every year to keep global warming at levels set in the Paris goals. Such technology is known as geoengineering or climate intervention.

20.Jul.2020


Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens

Widespread use of pesticides can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study. The infection, which can trigger lifelong liver and kidney damage, affects hundreds of millions of people every year and is second only to malaria among parasitic diseases, in terms of its global impact on human health.

17.Jul.2020


Reduction in commercial flights due to COVID-19 leading to less accurate weather forecasts

Weather forecasts have become less accurate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in commercial flights, according to new research. A new study finds the world lost 50 to 75 percent of its aircraft weather observations between March and May of this year, when many flights were grounded due to the pandemic.

17.Jul.2020